Neuigkeiten | News

Pressemitteilungen

ENAR Press Release: What a surprise! No equal opportunities in jobs for ethnic and religious minorities in Europe

Brussels, 17 March 2014 – For Black people, Roma, Muslims, migrants from non-EU countries, and women with a minority or migrant background living in Europe, discrimination is a major obstacle when looking for a job. Even once in employment, things don’t get better. This is the conclusion of ENAR’s 2012/13 Shadow Report on racism and discrimination in employment in Europe, released ahead of International Day Against Racial Discrimination.


The economic crisis has worsened discrimination against minorities and migrants and increased the employment gap between ethnic minorities and the majority population. In Finland and Belgium, unemployment rates are three times higher for people born outside the EU than for the native-born population. African migrants in Spain are twice as likely to be unemployed compared to people from the majority population.


Discrimination at the stage of recruitment manifests itself for instance when the selection is on the basis of names and addresses or in discriminatory practices of recruitment agencies. In the United Kingdom, people with foreign sounding names are a third less likely to be shortlisted for jobs than people with white British sounding names. In the Netherlands, more than half of recruitment agencies complied with a request not to introduce Moroccan, Turkish or Surinamese candidates.


Even once they are in a job, ethnic and religious minorities continue to face unequal treatment. Lower wages, glass ceiling, precarious and difficult working conditions, harassment and abusive dismissal are just some of the manifestations. In Hungary for instance, wages paid to Roma are lower than the Hungarian minimum wage. In Poland, migrant workers are often forced to work overtime under the threat of dismissal.


These discriminatory practices occur despite the existence of EU legislation prohibiting discrimination in employment. The report highlights that these laws are not always as efficient as they should be. There are also numerous obstacles to bringing cases to court, including the difficulty to prove discrimination, a lack of trust in the judicial system, lack of awareness of legal protections, and the length and cost of proceedings. Although efforts are being made by institutions and organisations - including trade unions and employers - to tackle this reality, they are few and far between.


ENAR Chair Sarah Isal said: “It is worrying to see the lack of political will to tackle discrimination in employment when we see how pervasive and widespread it is across Europe. It’s time politicians take this issue seriously, especially as access to quality work will be a high priority among voters - including members of minorities - for the upcoming European elections. They should realise that discriminating and excluding individuals from jobs results in a huge waste of talents and skills, of human and financial resources, and ultimately affects progress and the well-being of all people living in Europe.”


For further information, contact:

Georgina Siklossy, Communication and Press Officer

Tel: +32 (0)2 229 35 70 - Mobile: +32 (0)473 490 531 - Email: georgina@enar-eu.org - Web: www.enar-eu.org


Notes to the editor:

  1. The European Network Against Racism (ENAR aisbl) stands up against racism and discrimination and advocates for equality and solidarity for all in Europe. We connect local and national anti-racist NGOs throughout Europe and voice the concerns of ethnic and religious minorities in European and national policy debates.
  2. ENAR’s Shadow Report on racism and discrimination in employment in Europe draws on 23 national Shadow Reports (Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom). The European and national reports are available here: http://www.enar-eu.org/Page_Generale.asp?DocID=15294&langue=EN
  3. See also our fact sheet of key findings on racism and discrimination in employment in Europe.
  4. On 21 March 1960, 69 Black demonstrators were killed at a peaceful protest against apartheid laws in South Africa. As a result, 21<sup> </sup>March was declared "International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination” by the UN in 1966.
AnhangGröße
EUshadowReport2013_final.pdf2.28 MB

ENAR Shadow Report 2012/13 on racism in Europe: Key findings on racism and discrimination in employment

The European Network Against Racism (ENAR) 2012/13 Shadow Report on racism and discrimination in Europe focuses on employment, and assesses how discrimination affects ethnic and religious minorities as well as migrants in accessing the labour market and in the workplace. The findings are based on data and information from ENAR’s national Shadow Reports from 23 European countries. Five groups are identified as being most vulnerable to discrimination in employment: migrants from non-EU Member States; Roma; Muslims; people of African descent and Black Europeans; and women with a minority or migrant background. Despite the existence of a legal framework, discrimination in employment is still experienced as a widespread phenomenon.


Manifestations of racism and discrimination in employment


  • The economic and financial crisis, and the lack of social investment, have worsened the employment gap between migrants, ethnic and religious minorities and the majority population.
  • In Finland and Belgium, unemployment rates are three times higher for people born outside the EU than for the native-born population.
  • African migrants in Spain are twice as likely to be unemployed as people from the majority population.
  • In the Netherlands, Moroccans have the highest unemployment rates.
  • A study by the EU Fundamental Rights Agency shows that among eleven Member States, one out of three Roma respondents reported that they were unemployed.



  • Discrimination affecting migrants and minorities place them at disadvantage already when they attempt to access the labour market.
  • In Hungary, 64% of migrant respondents to a survey admitted having experienced discrimination when looking for a job.
  • Migrants in Germany are less likely to find employment than Germans with the same level of education but without a migrant status or background.
  • In the United Kingdom, people with foreign sounding names are a third less likely to be shortlisted for jobs than people with white British sounding names.
  • In France, applicants who live in socially disadvantaged areas, e.g. poorer suburbs of Paris or Lyon, face discrimination.
  • In the Netherlands, 57% of recruitment agencies complied with a request not to introduce Moroccan, Turkish or Surinamese candidates.
  • In Spain, a young Muslim woman who finished her university studies in pharmacology with the second best grade could not find a job for three years because she did not want to take off her veil.



  • Even once are in a job, migrants and minorities continue to face unequal treatment: lower wages, a lack of career prospects, precarious and difficult working conditions, harassment, abusive dismissal, are just some of the manifestations.
  • In Hungary, wages paid to Roma are lower than the Hungarian minimum wage.
  • In Austria, people with a Turkish background earn 20% less that their Austrian colleagues without a migrant background.
  • In Italy, 34% of foreigners are employed as unskilled workers compared with 8% of the majority population.
  • In the Czech Republic, respondents to a survey stated that they had been denied promotion with the explanation “that it is not yet time for a black person to work in a management position”.
  • A Polish study on threatening dismissal practices concluded that in many cases migrant workers are forced to work overtime under the threat of dismissal.



  • The European Union has adopted laws to combat discrimination in employment which are now part of EU Member States’ national laws, but there remain a number of gaps in implementation and protection mechanisms. These include:
  • The difficulty to prove discrimination;
  • A lack of trust in the judicial system;
  • A lack of awareness of legal provisions;
  • The length and cost of proceedings;
  • Fear of re-victimisation.

Selected recommendations

  • Labour market indicators (employment and unemployment rates) are not enough to know how many people experience discrimination on the grounds of their racial or ethnic origin and religion/belief. EU institutions and Member States should therefor adopt a common framework for the collection and analysis of reliable and comparable disaggregated equality data to fight discrimination in employment.
  • EU institutions should develop guidelines for employers to accommodate religious and cultural diversity in the workplace.
  • EU institutions and Member States should ensure that labour market regulations respect the “equal status and equal pay for equal work” principle and that all workers (EU Member State nationals, EU migrants and non-EU migrants) enjoy equal treatment.
  • Common EU standards on labour inspection should be established, geared towards detecting discrimination on the ground of ethnic origin and religion/belief.

To read the full report, visit www.enar-eu.org/Page_Generale.asp?DocID=15294&langue=EN

Presseerklärung: Internationale Lernpartnerschaft ACCESS fordert die Ansiedlung der 300 lybischen Flüchtlinge in Hamburg

Die internationale Lernparnterschaft ACCESS* und das Institut für Migrations- und Rassismusforschung (iMiR) fordern die sofortige freiwillige Ansiedlung der 300 obdachlosen Lybien-Flüchtlinge in Hamburg.

Im Rahmen ihrer Abschlusstagung hat sich die Lernpartnerschaft, die in den letzten 2 Jahren ein Handbuch zur Arbeit mit Flüchtlingen gemeinsam hergestellte hat, über die Situation der lybischen Flüchtlinge in Hamburg informiert.

Musa Kirkar aus Palermo kenn die Situation der Flüchtlinge in Italien. Seine Organisation (CEIPES) ist Teil eines Unterstützernetzwerkes für Flüchtlinge in Palermo. Er sagt: "Die Flüchtlinge haben bei uns zur Zeit augrunnd der Krise keine Zukunft. Seid solidarisch und helft ihnen, weil wir es nicht können".

Die lybischen Flüchtlinge sind afrikanische Gastarbeiter aus Lybien, die aufgrund der gewaltsamen Veränderung dort nun als "Ghadaffi-Freunde" verfolgt werden. Unter Einsatz ihres Lebens sind sie noch Italien gekommen. Aufgrund der Überlastung Italiens wurden sie weiter geschickt und sind in Hamburg gelandet.

Dr. Hieronymus vom iMiR und Vorstand im Europäischen Netz gegen Rasismus (ENAR), sagt: "Gerade in dem Moment, wo durch die Volkszählung deutlich wurde das Hamburg über 80.000 Einwohner weniger hat als erwartet, sich die Pogrome von Hoyerswerda, Rostock, Mölln und Solingen zum 20. mal jähren und wo Deutschland von der UN wegen seiner Flüchtlingspoitik verurteilt wurde, gibt es die Möglichkeit ein positives Zeichen zu setzen. In einem Europa, in dem die Menschenrechte gelten und Rassismus keine Chance haben soll, ist es Zeit Solidarität praktisch zu leben und ein Zeichen für ein anderes Europa zu setzen. Als Unterzeichner der Städteallianz gegen Diskriminierung sollte der Hamburger Senat auch davon Abstand nehmen, die Flüchtlinge zum Gegenstand des Wahlkampfts zu machen, wie dies unter dem damaligen Innensenator Scholz 2001 schon einmal passiert ist."


  • Die Lernpartnerschaft besteht aus dem iMiR und RESPECT Refugees Europe (Spanien), AUR – ANSRU (Rumänien), Svenska Kyrkan (Schweden), AOF Randers (Dänemark), CEIPES (Italien), Stowarzyszenie Obszary Kultury (Polen), Klaipedos apskrities teisininku (Litauen) und IHAD (Türkei).

Press Release: International Learning Partnership ACCESS calls for the resettlement of the 300 Libyan refugees in Hamburg

The international Learning Partnership ACCESS* and the Institute Researching Migration and Racism (iMiR) demand the immediate voluntary resettlement of 300 homeless Libyan refugees in Hamburg. As part of their final meeting the Learning Partnership, which has worked over the last 2 years on a manual for people working with refugees have been informed about the situation of these Libyan refugees in Hamburg.

Musa Kirkar from Palermo knows the situation of refugees from Italy. His organization (CEIPES) is part of a Support Network for refugees in Palermo. He says: "Due to the crisis, the refugees currently have no future in Italy. Show solidarity and help them, because we cannot help them at the moment".

These Libyan refugees are African guest workers from Libya, who fled Libya after the violent overturn of the government, as they are seen there as "Ghadaffi-friends". Risking their lives, they came to Italy. Due to the congestion in Italy, they were sent on, and have ended up in Hamburg.

Dr. Andreas Hieronymus from iMiR and Board member of the European Network against Racism (ENAR), says: "Just at the moment when the census made clear that Hamburg has about 80,000 inhabitants less than expected, when we remember the pogroms of Hoyerswerda, Rostock, Mölln and Solingen 20 years ago and where Germany was condemned by the UN for its refugee and asylum policies, there is the opportunity to set a positive example, for an Europe in which all human rights are respected and racism should have no chance. It's time to practice and live solidarity and to set an example that another Europe is possible. As a signatory of the cities alliance against discrimination, the Hamburg Senate also should refrain from making the refugees the subject of the election campaign, as has happened in 2001 under the former senator of the interior Scholz".


  • The Learning Partnership consists of the iMiR and RESPECT Refugees Europe (Spain), AUR - ANSRU (Romania), Svenska Kyrkan (Sweden), AOF Randers (Denmark), CEIPES (Italy), Stowarzyszenie Obszary Kultury (Poland), Klaipedos apskrities teisininku ( Lithuania) and IHAD (Turkey).


ENAR PRESS RELEASE: Bad times for Muslims in Europe

Brussels, 20 March 2013 – Islamophobia, or discrimination against Muslims, is widespread in many European countries. Prejudice towards Muslims is often more visible than that affecting other religious or ethnic minority groups. This is the conclusion of the first pan-European qualitative survey on Muslim communities in Europe, part of ENAR’s 2011/12 Shadow Report on Racism in Europe and released ahead of International Day Against Racial Discrimination.

Manifestations of Islamophobia include discrimination and violence towards Muslims, criminal damage to Islamic buildings, and protests against the building of mosques even in countries, such as Poland, where some Muslim communities have been established and integrated for centuries. Muslim women and girls are particularly affected, facing an extreme form of double discrimination on the basis of both their religion and their gender. In France for instance, 85% of all Islamophobic acts target women.

In addition, anti-Muslim and anti-immigration discourses, promoted and exacerbated by both extremist and mainstream political parties, are fuelling discrimination and preventing ethnic and religious communities from participating fully in the European society and economy. This scapegoating is used as a deviation from the ‘real issues’ by many politicians to cover up a lack of vision and leadership in contributing as much as would be expected of them in steering the recovery of European societies.

Based on data collected by anti-racist civil society across Europe, the Shadow Report also highlights that discrimination continues to affect the lives of many ethnic and religious minorities throughout Europe as regards their access to education, employment, housing, goods and services as well as how they are treated by the police and criminal justice systems. For instance, Roma children form approximately one third of the ‘special needs’ school population in the Czech Republic. In Ireland, a study was conducted whereby fictitious CVs were sent to recruiters, half with recognisably Irish names and the other half with African, Asian and German names. It found that candidates with Irish names were twice as likely to be invited to interviews as non-Irish candidates with comparable levels of skills and qualifications.

ENAR Chair Chibo Onyeji said: “Today is also International Day of Happiness – an occasion to highlight that decision makers have a responsibility to ensure that ethnic and religious minorities in Europe also enjoy happy and fulfilling lives. The current climate of rising xenophobia and racist violence reflected in our Shadow Report findings should not obliterate the fact that, whatever our skin colour or our beliefs, we all strive for a better life, a better future, with better chances for our offspring. No special privileges are expected, but a clear political commitment to equality and inclusion for all people living in Europe is.”

For further information, contact:
Georgina Siklossy, Communication and Press Officer
Tel: +32 (0)2 229 35 70 - Mobile: +32 (0)473 490 531 - Email: georgina@enar-eu.org - Web: www.enar-eu.org

Notes to the editor:
1. The European Network Against Racism (ENAR aisbl) stands up against racism and discrimination and advocates for equality and solidarity for all in Europe. We connect local and national anti-racist NGOs throughout Europe and voice the concerns of ethnic and religious minorities in European and national policy debates.
2. ENAR’s Shadow Report on Racism in Europe draws on 26 national Shadow Reports prepared by ENAR members. It identifies communities vulnerable to racism and presents an overview of manifestations of racism in a range of areas.
3. On 21 March 1960, 69 Black demonstrators were killed at a peaceful protest against apartheid laws in South Africa. As a result, 21 March was declared "International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination” by the UN in 1966.

Pressemitteilung: ENAR-Schattenberichte 2012 - Schlechte Zeiten für Muslime in Europa

Hamburg, 21.03.2013

(siehe:http://www.enar-eu.org/Page_Generale.asp?DocID=15294&langue=EN)

Islamophobie und Diskriminierung von Muslimen ist in vielen europäischen Ländern verbreitet und Vorurteile gegenüber Muslimen ist oft größer als die von anderen religiösen oder ethnischen Minderheiten erlebt wird. Dies ist das Ergebnis des ersten pan-europäischen qualitative Studie über muslimische Gemeinschaften in Europa, Teil des ENAR Schattenberichts über Rassismus in Europa 2011/12, der am Internationalen Tag gegen Rassismus veröffentlicht wird.

Der Schattenbericht, der auf gesammelten Daten anti-rassistischer Nichtregierungsorganisationen in ganz Europa beruht, macht darauf aufmerksam, dass ethnische und religiöse Minderheiten, wie Muslime mit Diskriminierung und Ausschluss in Europa in allen Bereichen des Lebens konfrontiert sind: vom Arbeitsmarkt bis zur Bildung, vom Wohnungsmarkt zur polizeilichen Arbeit.

Muslime in Deutschland sind Zielscheibe anti-muslimischer Ideologien, institutioneller ausgrenzender Strukturen, sowie rassistischer und diskriminierender Praktiken. Zu diesem Schluss kommt der ENAR-Schattenbericht 2011/12 zu Deutschland.

Während der ehemalige Bundespräsident Christian Wulff den Islam zu Deutschland zählte, wurden die rassistischen Morde des sogenannten "NSU" aufgedeckt und haben ein Ermittlungsversagen der Behörden offengelegt, welches in seiner ganzen Dimension noch nicht absehbar ist, so der Schattenbericht.

Zehn Menschen wurden ermordet: Enver Şimşek, Abdurrahim Özüdoğru, Süleyman Taşköprü, Habil Kılıç, Yunus Turgut, İsmail Yaşar, Theodoros Boulgarides, Mehmet Kubaşık, Michele Kiesewetter, Halit Yozgat.

Die rassistische Gewalt neonazistischer Strukturen materialisierte sich über zehn Jahre lang parallel zu einem anti-muslimischen Integrationsdiskurs und einem akademischen Mittelstandsrassismus in Sarrazin-Manier.

Das Schweigen welches nach dem Aufdecken des NSU erdrückend über der deutschen Gesellschaft liegt ist bezeichnend für eine beklemmende Atmosphäre in denen sich Deutsche mit Migrationshintergrund und Migrant_innen bewegen und wo sich, durch das Versagen der Sicherheitsbehörden, das Versprechen staatlichen Schutzes in Luft auflöste. Die Regierung reagierte auf die Ereignisse mit Kürzungen in der zivilgesellschaftlichen Antidiskriminierungsarbeit und der Stärkung von staatlichen Sicherheitsstrukturen sowie der Forcierung des Anti-Extremismus Diskurs, in dem "Linke", "Rechte" und "Fundamentalisten" gleichgesetzt werden.

Dabei sind gerade weibliche Muslime von Diskriminierung in mehrfacher Weise betroffen. Sie werden aus ethnischen, religiösen und geschlechtspezifischen Gründen diskriminiert. Muslimischen Frauen werden in die Religionsfreiheit und ihre Selbstbestimmung als Frau abgesprochen.

Darüber hinaus untergraben europaweite, rassistische öffentliche Diskurse, die von einigen Politikern und Medien geschürt werden Antidiskriminierungsgesetze und Integrationspolitik und fördern die Zunahme rassistischer Gewalt und Kriminalität in ganz Europa.

ENAR Präsident Chibo Onyeji sagte: "Der Mangel an politischem Engagement für die Gleichstellung und den Anti-Rassismus ist umso beunruhigender, da es in dem aktuellen Klima eine wachsende Gewalt gegen ethnische und religiöse Minderheiten gibt. Ein Indikator für eine gesunde und lebendige Gesellschaft ist es, dass in Zeiten politischer und wirtschaftlicher Unsicherheit Minderheiten nicht zu Sündenböcken gemacht werden, aber dieses Stadium haben wir noch nicht erreicht."


Für mehr Informationen

  • Deutschland: Dr. Andreas Hieronymus, Tel. ++49-40-4305396, e-mail: office@imir.de, http://www.imir.de
  • Europa: Georgina Siklossy, Communication and Press Officer, Tel: +32 (0)2 229 35 70 - E-mail: georgina@enar-eu.org - Website: http://www.enar-eu.org


Anmerkungen zum Herausgeber


  • Das europäische Netzwerk gegen Rassismus (ENAR) ist ein Zusammenschluss von mehr als 700 NGOs, die daran arbeiten, Rassismus in allen EU-Mitgliedsstaaten zu bekämpfen. ENAR hat das Ziel, Rassismus, rassistische Diskriminierung, Xenophobie und damit verbundene Intoleranz zu bekämpfen und Gleichbehandlung zwischen EU-Mitgliedern und Drittstaatenangehörigen zu fördern.
  • Der ENAR-Schattenbericht zu Rassismus in Europa greift auf 27 nationale Schattenberichte zurück, die von den ENAR-Mitgliedern erstellt wurden. Er identifiziert für Rassismus anfällige Gruppen und bietet einen Überblick über Erscheinungsformen von Rassismus in vielen verschiedenen Bereichen, ebenso wie eine Einschätzung des gesetzlichen und politischen Kontext.
  • Am 21. März 1960 wurden 69 schwarze Demonstranten bei einem friedlichen Protest gegen Apartheitsgesetze in Südafrika getötet. Deswegen wurde der 21. März 1966 von der UN als „Internationaler Tag für die Abschaffung von rassistischer Diskriminierung“ erklärt.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

iMiR - Institut fuer Migrations- und Rassismusforschung e.V.

Nernstweg 32-34, D-22765 Hamburg

Tel./Fax:++49-40-430 53 96

e-mail: office@imir.de, web site: http://www.imir.de

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

AnhangGröße
Germany.pdf1.02 MB

Offener Brief zur „größten NDR-Produktion aller Zeiten“

10 November: „Der Tag der Norddeutschen“

Lieber NDR,

wir sind tief enttäuscht. Wir dachten immer, Norddeutschland mit seinen internationalen Hafenstädten wie Hamburg und Bremen wäre weltoffen. Und dann das? Ihr porträtiert am 10. November, dem „Tag der Norddeutschen“, 121 Norddeutsche. An diesem Tag wollt ihr uns auf allen Wellen einen ganzen Tag lang erzählen, wie Norddeutschland tickt. Aber ach: Eure Uhr ist vor vielen Jahren stehengeblieben.

Ihr schafft es, unter den 121 Menschen, die ihr uns vorstellt, (mit Ausnahme eines Bremer Bäckers, eines Hannoveraner Musikers und eines Hamburger Kaffeeverkäufers aus der Karibik („eine Frohnatur aus Barbados“ (NDR-O-Ton) ) nicht eine Person mit erkennbar außer-europäischem Migrationshintergrund zu zeigen. Das muss man erst mal schaffen! Gibt es in Eurer norddeutschen Welt keine weiteren Muslime, keine Menschen, deren Wurzeln in Asien oder Afrika liegen, niemand aus dem Iran, Ägypten, China oder Japan, die schon lange hier leben und die unser a l l e r Norddeutschland bereichern? Habt ihr unter euren Gebührenzahlern keine Zugewanderten? Habt ihr noch nie davon gehört, dass etwa jeder fünfte in Norddeutschland einen Migrationshintergrund hat? Ihr müsst nicht alle porträtieren, aber der eine oder andere würde sich schon lohnen.

Kennt ihr nicht Feridun Zaimoglu oder Fatih Akin und all die anderen. Wir könnten euch die Adressen geben. Nicht wenige sagen schmunzelnd von sich selbst: Wir sind Deutscher als die Deutschen. Wenn eure Auswahl Norddeutschland sein soll – dann müssen wir euch sagen – dass wir in einem anderen Norddeutschland leben. Eure Provinzialität ist euch übrigens nicht in die Wiege gelegt: Schaut euch mal um beim britischen BBC, eurem Geburtshelfer nach dem Krieg, auf den ihr euch gern beruft und auf den sogar der Name der Straße zurück geht, an der euer großer Hamburger Sender liegt (Hugh-Greene-Weg). Dort macht man sich seit Jahrzehnten Gedanken über die Aufgabe eine „öffentlich-rechtlichen“ Rundfunks in einer offenen Gesellschaft. Dabei hat der NDR 2008 die "Charta der Vielfalt" unterschrieben. Dort stehen so schöne Sätze drin wie: "Der NDR ist ein Sender für a l l e Menschen, primär in Norddeutschland." Für den NDR stellt "die Ansprache von Menschen mit Einwanderungsbiografie einen Teil seiner Programmarbeit" dar. Zukünftig soll "die ethnische und kulturelle Vielfalt der Gesellschaft" in den NDR Programmangeboten stärker abgebildet werden. Ruft uns einfach an, wenn ihr mehr wissen wollt. Recherchiert, es lohnt sich.

Worum geht es: Am 10. November begeht der NDR auf vielen seiner Sendeplätze den „Tag der Norddeutschen“, die „größte Doku des Nordens“, so die Eigenwerbung. Dazu werden 121 Norddeutsche porträtiert, von der Hebamme bis zum Kaffeeverkäufer, dem Arzt bis zu einem Chefredakteur. Allerdings sind unter den „Protagonisten“ bis auf einen Mann aus der Karibik, einen Bremer Bäcker und einen Hannoveraner Musiker mit türkischen Wurzeln kaum Menschen mit erkennbarem nicht-europäischen Migrationshintergrund. Muslime kommen also fast nicht vor, Schwarze gar nicht, Zugewanderte aus Asien (Indien, China, Japan etc.) ebenfalls nicht. Das entspricht ziemlich exakt der Zusammensetzung des Rundfunkrats des NDR. Dort „repräsentieren 58 Frauen und Männer die norddeutsche Öffentlichkeit“ (O-Ton NDR), von denen nur eine einzige Person erkennbar Migrationshintergrund hat, die Politikerin Aydan Özogus (SPD). In Norddeutschland haben mindestens 20 Prozent der Einwohner (und letztlich auch Gebührenzahler) einen Migrationshintergrund.

Verantwortlich: iMiR – Institut für Migrations- und Rassismusforschung, Dr. Andreas Hieronymus. Nernstweg 32-34, 22765 Hamburg, Tel.: 040/413 696 18, e-mail: hieronymus@imir.de

Unterzeichner_innen:

1. Mostafa Morid, Vorstandsmitglied: Bund Iranischer Vereine Hamburg, Mitglied des Integrationsbeirates, Vorstandsmitglied: Deutsch-Iranischer Akademiker Club e.V., Vorstandsmitglied: Verein zur Verteidigung der Menschenrechte und Demokratie e.V.

2. Cora Barrelet, Lehrerin, Pinneberg

3. Prof. Dr. Ursula Neumann, Universität Hamburg

4. Prof. Dr. Wolfram Weiße, Universität Hamburg

5. Dr. Dagmar Knorr, Universität Hamburg, Schreibwerkstatt Mehrsprachigkeit

6. Dr. Katja Francesca Cantone-Altıntaș, Professorin für Deutsch als Zweit- und Fremdsprache an der Universität Duisburg-Essen, wohnhaft in Hamburg.

7. Maryam Anwary, Hamburg (Harburg), Gymnasiallehrerin, Gymnasium Süderelbe

8. Laya Zoroofchi

9. Ivona Mekis

10. Vorstand der Werkstatt 3, Hamburg

11. Edgar Mebus, Hamburg

12. Armin Kretschmann, Mölln, Dipl. Pädagoge

Pressemitteilung: ENAR-Schattenberichte 2011 - Wirtschaftliche Rezession verstärkt Rassismus und rassistische Diskriminierung

Hamburg, 21.03.2012

(siehe: http://platform.imir.de/?q=content/schattenberichte-2011)

Die Wirtschaftskrise hat negative Auswirkungen auf Migranten und ethnische Minderheiten, da sie besonders anfällig für Arbeitslosigkeit und prekäre Arbeitsbedingungen sind. Die wirtschaftliche Rezension verbreitet außerdem Angst in der allgemeinen Öffentlichkeit, die rassistisches Verhalten auslöst und führte zu finanziellen Einschnitten in der Anti-Rassismus-Arbeit in vielen Ländern, mit der Folge, dass es weniger Aktivitäten zur Bekämpfung von Rassismus und Xenophobie gibt. Hier nun einige Schlussfolgerungen aus dem ENAR-Schattenbericht über Rassismus in Europa 2010-2011, herausgegeben am Internationalen Tag gegen Rassismus.

Der Bericht, der auf gesammelten Daten anti-rassistischer Nichtregierungsorganisationen in ganz Europa beruht, macht darauf aufmerksam, dass ethnische und religiöse Minderheiten mit Diskriminierung und Ausschluss in Europa in allen Bereichen des Lebens konfrontiert sind: vom Arbeitsmarkt bis zur Bildung, vom Wohnungsmarkt zur polizeilichen Betreuung. In Spanien wurde zum Beispiel ein Mann mit Migrationshintergrund entlassen, weil er einen Arbeitsvertrag verlangte, nachdem er für zwei Monate neun Stunden am Tag, sechs Tage die Woche für einen Lohn von 600 Euro gearbeitet hatte. In Rumänien ist die Lebenserwartung von Roma zehn Jahre weniger als die der anderen Europäer und fast die Hälfte von der Roma-Kinder erhält keine angemessene Impfung.


  • Rassistisch motivierte Gewalt, die sowohl von Neo-Nazi Gruppen als auch von anderen Tätern verübt wurde, ist gleichzeitig mit einem wachsenden Erfolg von rechtsextremistischen Parteien, zum Beispiel im Vereinigten Königreich, Dänemark, Ungarn, Griechenland und Polen, verbunden.
  • Der Bericht beleuchtet außerdem, dass Leute afrikanischer Abstammung in verschiedenen EU Mitgliedsstaaten besonders anfällig für Rassismus und rassistische Diskriminierung sind und ihre Sichtbarkeit verstärkt diese Verletzbarkeit. Im Vereinigten Königreich werden „Schwarze“ zum Beispiel mit mindestens sechs Mal größerer Wahrscheinlichkeit angehalten und durchsucht als Weiße. In Spanien lehnten es 36,8% der Vermieter ab, an Afrikaner aus südlichen Gebieten der Sahara zu vermieten.
  • Der deutsche Schattenbericht stellt fest, dass Afro-Deutsche auf dem Arbeitsmarkt stärker von Diskriminierung betroffen sind als europäische Einwanderer oder Einwanderer mit türkischem Hintergrund.
  • Auch auf dem Wohnungsmarkt in Deutschland sind Menschen afrikanischer Herkunft oft vermehrt von Diskriminierung betroffen.
  • Obwohl die EU-Mitgliedsstaaten das EU-Antidiskriminierungsgesetz umgesetzt haben, wurden wenige Fälle vorgebracht und gesetzliche Bestimmungen werden oft nicht in die Praxis umgesetzt. Des Weiteren gibt es in vielen EU-Staaten eine Verschiebung hin zu restriktiverer Migrationspolitik, in denen Staaten nicht nur versuchen mehr Kontrolle über ihre Grenzen zu bekommen, sondern auch über das Recht in dem EU-Gebiet zu leben.


ENAR-Präsident Chibo Onyeji sagte: „Heute, am Internationalen Tag gegen Rassismus, ist es besonders beunruhigend zu sehen, dass Rassismus und Diskriminierung in der EU weiterhin so weit verbreitet sind. Politiker müssen Führungskraft zeigen und die Botschaft vermitteln, dass gleicher Zugang zu Jobs, Wohnungen und Schulbildung entscheidend sind, um eine erfolgreiche und inklusive Gesellschaft zu bauen, umso mehr in einer Wirtschaftskrise. Wir können es uns nicht leisten, ganze Teile der Bevölkerung im Abseits zu lassen.“


Für mehr Informationen

  • Deutschland: Dr. Andreas Hieronymus, Tel. ++49-40-4305396, e-mail: office@imir.de, http://www.imir.de
  • Europa: Georgina Siklossy, Communication and Press Officer, Tel: +32 (0)2 229 35 70 - E-mail: georgina@enar-eu.org - Website: http://www.enar-eu.org


Anmerkungen zum Herausgeber


  • Das europäische Netzwerk gegen Rassismus (ENAR) ist ein Zusammenschluss von mehr als 700 NGOs, die daran arbeiten, Rassismus in allen EU-Mitgliedsstaaten zu bekämpfen. ENAR hat das Ziel, Rassismus, rassistische Diskriminierung, Xenophobie und damit verbundene Intoleranz zu bekämpfen und Gleichbehandlung zwischen EU-Mitgliedern und Drittstaatenangehörigen zu fördern.
  • Der ENAR-Schattenbericht zu Rassismus in Europa greift auf 27 nationale Schattenberichte zurück, die von den ENAR-Mitgliedern erstellt wurden. Er identifiziert für Rassismus anfällige Gruppen und bietet einen Überblick über Erscheinungsformen von Rassismus in vielen verschiedenen Bereichen, ebenso wie eine Einschätzung des gesetzlichen und politischen Kontext.
  • Am 21. März 1960 wurden 69 schwarze Demonstranten bei einem friedlichen Protest gegen Apartheitsgesetze in Südafrika getötet. Deswegen wurde der 21. März 1966 von der UN als „Internationaler Tag für die Abschaffung von rassistischer Diskriminierung“ erklärt.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

iMiR - Institut fuer Migrations- und Rassismusforschung e.V.

Nernstweg 32-34, D-22765 Hamburg

Tel./Fax:++49-40-430 53 96

e-mail: office@imir.de, web site: http://www.imir.de

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Pressemitteilung vom 14.3.2012: Umbenennung zweier Hamburger Straßen nach Ramazan Avcı und Kemal Altun

Pressmitteilung zur PRESSEKONFERENZ am 14.3.2012, 10.00 Uhr, Kühne/Lage, Schützenstr. 39, 22761 Hamburg


Dr. Andreas Hieronymus unterstützt die Forderung nach Umbenennung zweier Hamburger Straßen nach Ramazan Avcı und Kemal Altun. Dies wäre ein erstes Zeichen, dass sich Hamburg ernsthaft dem Versagen der Ermittlungsbehörden nach der Ermordung des Hamburger Süleyman Tasköprü durch die Zwickauer Neonazis stellen möchte. Als weiterer Schritt sollte sich die Hamburger Bürgerschaft und Senat an der königlichen Macpherson-Kommission in Großbritannien orientieren, die sich nach der Ermordung von Steven Lawrence im April 1993, gebildet und institutionellen Rassismus in der britischen Polizei festgestellt hat.


Sehr geehrte PressevertreterInnen,


leider ist es mir aus gesundheitlichen Gründen nicht möglich an der Pressekonferenz teilzunehmen.


Es ist mir aber wichtig die RAMAZAN AVCI INITIATIVE HAMBURG in ihrem Anliegen zwei Plätze/Straßen in Hamburg nach Opfern (Ramazan Avcı und Kemal Altun) rassistischer Politik und Gewalt zu benennen, zu unterstützen. Beide Opfer stehen für die verschiedenen Aspekte rassistischer Gewalt, die nackte Gewalt der Neonazis und die institutionelle Gewalt staatlicher Einrichtungen. Genau dieses Doppelgesicht der rassistischen Gewalt ist das, was den deutschen Behörden und der deutschen Gesellschaft so schwer im Magen liegt und was sie so gerne verdrängt.


Erinnert sei daran, dass das Versagen der Hamburger Ermittlungsbehörden nach der Ermordung des Hamburger Süleyman Tasköprü durch die Zwickauer Neonazis nicht durch die Rückkehr zur Tagesordnung, der Abwehr eigener Schuld und durch verbesserte technischen Lösungen bei der Kooperation der Behörden bearbeitet werden kann. Es muss eine ehrliche Aufarbeitung des Versagens geben, mit dem Ziel, dass die Sicherheit in Hamburg auch für alle Bewohner/innen Hamburgs verfügbar ist.


Ein Beispiel für solch eine kritische Aufarbeitung des Versagens gibt es in Großbritannien. Am 22. April 1993 wurde Steven Lawrence von einer Gruppe weißer Rassisten erschlagen. Erst 19 Jahre später, am 4. Januar 2012, konnten zwei Täter verurteilt werden. Bisher war eine Verurteilung nicht möglich, weil notwendige Beweise während der Ermittlungsarbeit vernichtet wurden. Eine königliche Kommission (Mcpherson-Kommission) stellte institutionellen Rassismus in der britischen Polizei fest und empfahl eine Veränderung der gesamten Polizeiorganisation, die dann auch erfolgte.


Für einen Erfahrungsaustausch kann ich gerne über unser internationales Netzwerk ENAR Kontakte zu beteiligten Akteure, wie Beamten, Polizisten und Journalisten herstellen wenn dies gewünscht.


Es grüßt Sie

Dr. Andreas Hieronymus


Seit 2002 veröffentlicht das iMiR für Deutschland den Schattenbericht zu Rassismus und dokumentieren, dass Rechtsextremismus, direkter und institutioneller Rassismus zwei Seiten einer Medaille sind. Auch dieses Jahr wird am 21. März 2012, dem internationalen Tag gegen Rassismus der Europäische Schattenbericht zu Rassismus in Europa und 28 nationale Schattenberichte aus EU-Mitgliedsstaaten veröffentlicht. Sie dokumentieren die Vielfalt rassistischer Ereignisse und Gewalt in Europa. Rechte Gewalttaten stellen nur eine Teilmenge rassistischer Praktiken in Europa dar. Der rassistische Alltag ist oft viel banaler, aber oft nicht weniger schlimm in seinen Auswirkungen. Im Schattenbericht 2011 zu Deutschland sprechen wir für die Sicherheitsorgane folgende Empfehlungen aus:

  • Bewusstseinsbildung in den Innenministerien und in den Polizeiabteilung über die negativen Folgen ethnischer Profilbildungen in der Fahndung.
  • Die Entwicklung einer Kultur der Selbstkritik und einer Berufsethik innerhalb der Sicherheitsorgane.
  • Einführung eines verbindlichen Menschenrechtstrainings in die Weiterbildung von Polizeibeamten.

Die lange Liste der bekannten und unbekannten Opfer des Rechtsextremismus und des Rassismus mahnen uns zur Neuorientierung in der Bekämpfung rassistischer Praktiken, wo immer sie vorherrschend sind.

Kontakt: Dr. Andreas Hieronymus

iMiR – Institut für Migrations- und Rassismusforschung, Hamburg

Vorstand im Europäischen Netz gegen Rassismus (ENAR)

Nernstweg 32-34, 22765 Hamburg

hieronymus@imir.de

040/41369618

http://www.imir.de, http://www.enar-eu.org

AnhangGröße
PM_Ramanzan_Avci_Umbenennung_140312.pdf35.57 KB

Pressemitteilung, 21. März 2011

ENAR’s Europäischer Schattenbericht veröffentlicht: Das Ende des Rassismus ist noch weit weg - Deutscher Schattenbericht stellt fest: Antidiskriminierungskultur in Deutschland entwickelt sich langsam

Daten, die von der anti-rassistischen Zivilgesellschaft quer durch Europa gesammelt wurden verweisen auf auf rassistische Praktiken in auf vielen Feldern, wie z.B. Arbeitsmarkt, Wohnungsmarkt, Bildung, Gesundheit, Polizei, Zugang zu Waren und Dienstleistungen und Medien. Der Schattenbericht beleuchtet auch, dass Extremismus und rassistische Gewalt auf dem Vormarsch in Europa sind. Barrieren verhindern eine effektive Gleichberechtigung, gerade auch in Zeiten der Finanzkrise.

Der Europäische Schattenberichte setzt sich aus 27 nationalen Schattenberichten zusammen, die von den ENAR-Mitgliedsorganisationen quer durch die Europäische Union, diesmal inklusive Kroatien, erstellt wurden. Auch für Deutschland wurde ein Schattenbericht erstellt. Die Berichte identifizieren besonders von Rassismus betroffene Gruppen und präsentieren einen Überblick über rassistische Praktiken, aber bewerten auch rechtliche und politische Kontexte und die Reaktionen der Regierungen darauf.

--> weitere Informationen

Für Deutschland wurden u.a. folgende Befunde festgestellt:

  • Im Bereich der Beschäftigung wurde der Nachweis geführt, dass Personen mit Migrationshintergrund unabhängig von ihrer Qualifikation Diskriminierung im Zugang zum Arbeitsmarkt erfahren. Die Abwanderung von hoch qualifizierten Personen mit Migrationshintergrund in die Türkei, die auf Diskriminierung zurück zu führen ist, steigt. Die Nicht-Anerkennung ausländischer Abschlüsse bleibt weiterhin ein großes Problem.
  • Die Medien haben begonnen über Diskriminierung zu berichten. Über Rassismus wird jedoch nur auf öffentlichen oder internationalen Druck hin berichtet. Stereotypien und Hassreden gegen den Islam sind verbreitet und sogenannte "Islamkritiker" bekommen regelmäßig ein breites öffentliches Forum. Ein öffentliches Forum für andere Perspektiven wird nicht geboten, mit der Folge, dass Muslime sich von Mainstream-Medien abwenden.
  • Aktuelle Studien legen nahe, dass es eine große Anzahl von Diskriminierungsfällen gegen ethnische Minderheiten gibt, die von Betroffenen nicht gemeldet werden. Erste Gerichtsurteile zum Thema Diskriminierung auf dem Arbeitsmarkt, beim Zugang zu Waren, Dienstleistungen und Wohnungen wurden gefällt.

--> weitere Informationen

Das Europäische Netzwerk gegen Rassismus (ENAR) ist ein Netzwerk von Europäischen Nichtregierungsorganisation die gemeinsam Rassismus in allen EU-Staaten bekämpfen. ENAR repräsentiert mehr als 700 Nichtregierungsorganisation verteilt über die ganze Europäische Union. Es wurde 1997 im Europäischen Jahr gegen Rassismus gegründet. Es zielt auf die Bekämpfung von Rassismus, Fremdenfeindlichkeit, Antisemitismus und Islamophobie und fördert die Gleichbehandlung von EU-Bürger und Drittstaatsangehörigen. Das Netz gegen Rassismus, für gleiche Rechte (NgR) ist die deutsche Sektion für ENAR. Das NgR ist ein loser Zusammenschluss von Nichtregierungsorganisationen in Deutschland, die gegen Rassismus und ethnische Diskriminierung arbeiten. Sie tun dies in ihrer individuellen Kapazität als auch in der Kooperation innerhalb des Netzes.

Die Schattenberichte finden Sie auch unter www.enar-eu.org und www.netz-gegen-rassismus.de.

The Equal Rights Trust: Two Found Guilty of Murder of Stephen Lawrence

Two Found Guilty of Murder of Stephen Lawrence

London, 6 January 2011

On 3 January 2012 two men, Gary Dobson and David Norris, were found guilty of the racially-motivated murder of teenager Stephen Lawrence (R v Dobson & Norris). The murder, described by the head of the judiciary of England and Wales as a crime “which scarred the conscience of the nation”, occurred in April 1993. Yet police failings in investigating the crime meant that until 2012, no one had been brought to justice. ERT welcomes the convictions, which mark the latest stage in a chain of events which have fundamentally changed the landscape of race relations in Britain.

Thanks to campaigning by the parents and supporters of Stephen Lawrence, a public inquiry was established in 1997 to consider "matters arising from the death of Stephen Lawrence (…) in order particularly to identify the lessons to be learned for the investigation and prosecution of racially motivated crimes". The inquiry’s concluding report, known as the Macpherson Report, is considered groundbreaking for shedding light on the existence of “institutional racism”, which it defined thus:

"Institutional Racism" consists of the collective failure of an organisation to provide an appropriate and professional service to people because of their colour, culture or ethnic origin. It can be seen or detected in processes, attitudes and behaviour which amount to discrimination through unwitting prejudice, ignorance, thoughtlessness, and racist stereotyping which disadvantage minority ethnic people.

In addition to finding that the investigation in Stephen Lawrence’s case was “marred by a combination of professional incompetence, institutional racism and a failure of leadership by senior officers”, the report went further:

institutional racism affects the MPS [Metropolitan Police Service], and Police Services elsewhere. Furthermore our conclusions as to Police Services should not lead to complacency in other institutions and organisations. Collective failure is apparent in many of them, including the Criminal Justice system. It is incumbent upon every institution to examine their policies and the outcome of their policies and practices to guard against disadvantaging any section of our communities.

The report contained 70 recommendations, including in relation to:

  • the independent inspection of police services;
  • the application of freedom of information rights to all areas of policing;
  • the application of race discrimination legislation to all police officers;
  • the definition of a “racist incident”;
  • guidance and procedures on the reporting, recording and investigation of racist crimes;
  • the availability, training and duties of Family Liaison Officers;
  • the treatment of victims, victims’ families and witnesses of racist crimes;
  • the prosecution of racist crimes;
  • racism awareness training in the police services;
  • police powers to stop and search;
  • recruitment and retention of minority ethnic staff in the police services; and
  • public education.

The report also recommended that the objective of increasing trust and confidence in policing amongst ethnic minority communities should be a Ministerial Priority.

In 2009, a UK parliamentary committee considered progress made to tackle racism in the police in the 10 years since the Macpherson Report. It was told by the Home Office that 67 of the report’s recommendations had been either partly or fully implemented. The parliamentary committee concluded that while “tremendous strides” had been made by the police “in the service they provide to ethnic minority communities and in countering racism amongst its workforce”, there remained “[a] number of concerns”. These included the disproportionate representation of black communities amongst those subject to stop and search by the police, the number of police officers from ethnic minority communities and the problems such officers face during their employment.

Commenting on the convictions in the Stephen Lawrence case, Dimitrina Petrova, ERT’s Executive Director, said:

“The racially-motivated murder of Stephen Lawrence, and the police failings in the investigation which followed, highlighted the significant problems which the UK faced in tackling racism many years after the enactment of the country’s first race equality legislation. Yet these events also acted as a catalyst for significant improvements in the understanding of institutional racism and the effectiveness of measures to address it.

The successful prosecution of two of Mr Lawrence’s killers is welcome, both in itself, and as a powerful symbol of the marked shift in attitudes towards racism which has taken place in response to the murder and investigation. It also acts as a timely reminder of the need for constant vigilance in the fight against prejudice and discrimination.”

To read the judge’s sentencing remarks in R v Dobson & Norris click here.

To read the Macpherson Report click here.

To read the report of the Home Affairs Select Committee click here.


Aufruf zur Schaffung einer Antirassismus- und Diversitäts-Intergruppe im Europäischen Parlament

Was ist das Ziel dieses Aufrufs?

Das Ziel dieses Aufrufs ist die Sensibilisierung für das Thema Antirassismus und Diversität in nationalen und lokalen Medien. Nationale und lokale Abgeordnete des Europaparliaments (MEP) sollen darin unterstützt werden Mitglied in der Intergruppe zu Antirassismus und Diversität zu werden. Die MEP’s können durch die Intergruppe ihre Möglichkeiten erweitern die Europäische Politik in Richtung Gleichberechtigung zu steuern. Sie können so auch ihren Einsatz für Themen der Gleichstellung von Menschen unterschiedlicher Herkunft und für die Nichtdiskriminierung für ihre Wählerschaft deutlich machen.

Was ist einer Intergruppe?

Intergruppen sind informelle Foren, die von Mitgliedern des Europäischen Parlments gebildet werden um Themen von gemeinsamen Interesse zu diskutieren und um die Gesetzgebung und die politische Arbeit des Europäischen Parlaments zu beeinflußen. Die Stärke einer Intergruppe liegt in der überfraktionellen Unterstützung um die parlamentarische Arbeit zu einem Thema voranzubringen.

Warum brauchen wir eine Intergruppe zu Antirassismus und Diversität im Europäischen Parliament?

  • 1 von 10 Europaabgeordneten gehört zu einer Partei, die rassistische Ideen und Politiken befördern.
  • Ungefähr eine/r von vier Europäer_innen wählten Mitglieder von xenophoben populistischen Parteien, die für den Ausschluss von randständigen Gruppen aus der Gesellschaft plädieren.
  • Sie können die parlamentarische Debatte und Abstimmungen stören oder unmöglich machen und produzieren so ein schlechtes Bild es Europaparlaments in den Medien.
  • Volksverhetzung (“Hate Speech”) kann von manchen als Rechtfertigung für rassistische Gewalt verstanden warden (es gab 42 von ENAR registrierte Vorfälle von Hassreden während der Europawahl-Kampagne).
  • Die einzigartige Stärke einer Intergruppe liegt darin, dass sie gewählte Repräsentanten aus verschiedensten politischen Spektren und Mitgliedsstaaten um ein gemeinsam geteiltes Interesse vereint. Diese informellen Gruppen bilden einen konzentrierten Fokus der parlamentarischen Aufmerksamkeit und der Expertise um ein Thema herum.

Wegen neuen Zusammensetzung nach der Europawahl braucht das Europäische Parlament eine starke anti-rassistische Intergruppe als ein Forum um starke Koalitionen zu bilden um der Herausforderung durch xenophobe populistische Sprache und Verhalten entgegenzutreten und die Folgen für die verschiedenen Politikfelder zu begrenzen.


100 Europäische, nationale und lokale Nichtregierungsorganisationen unterstützen den Aufruf zur Bildung einer starken Intergruppe.


Welchen Unterschied macht eine Anti-Rassismus- und Diversitäts-Intergruppe? Was bringt es den Europäischen Bürgern und Bewohnern?

  • Sie erweitert das Wissen zu antirassistischen Themen von Mitgliedern des Europaparlaments
  • Sie bieten einen strategischen Ansatz für die Kernthemen ihrer Arbeit, inclusive der Koordinierung mit anderen MEP’s, u.a.
  • Sie dient als Verbindungsglied und Vermittlerin zwischen dem Europäischen Parlament und der Zivilgesellschaft und der Außenwelt. Sie hilft bei der Vernetzung von unterschiedlichen einflußreichen Akteuren und sie kommuniziert mit der allgemeinen Öffentlichkeit, auch durch die sozialen Medien. Sie erlaubt den Wähler_innen zu verstehen was ihr/e gewählte/r Europaabgeordnete/r zu Fragen der Gleichstellung bezüglich der Herkunft macht. Wähler_innen erhalten Zugang zu Nachrichten über Diversität und Gleichstellung innerhalb des Europaparlaments und Wähler_innen haben einen Zugang um Fragen auf die Europäische Ebenen zu bringen.
  • Die Sichtbarkeit von Initiativen von Mitgliedern des Europaparlament zur Herstellung von Gleichheit für alle wird erhöht.

Leiten Sie diesen Aufruf an Ihre/n Europaabgeordnete/r weiter und überzeugen Sie Ihn/Sie sich an der Intergruppe zu beteiligen!!


Mit freundlichen Grüßen


Dr. Andreas Hieronymus

Vorstand im Europäischen Netz gegen Rassismus - ENAR

Das iMiR unterstützt die Online-Umfrage zum Thema „Diskriminierung in Deutschland 2015“




Am 1. September 2015 startet die Antidiskriminierungsstelle des Bundes (ADS) die bisher größte Umfrage zum Thema „Diskriminierung in Deutschland“.



Bis zum 30. November können sich alle in Deutschland lebenden Menschen ab 14 Jahren zu ihren selbst erlebten oder beobachteten Diskriminierungserfahrungen äußern. Diese Umfrage, welche die ADS gemeinsam mit dem Berliner Institut für empirische Integrations- und Migrationsforschung durchführt, soll Diskriminierungen sichtbar machen. Sie wollen auch wissen, welche Auswirkungen Diskriminierungen auf Menschen haben und wie sie damit umgehen. Die Ergebnisse der Umfrage und Handlungsempfehlungen wird die Antidiskriminierungsstelle dem Deutschen Bundestag vorlegen.



Um eine möglichst große Beteiligung an der Umfrage zu erreichen und eine breite Öffentlichkeit für das Thema Diskriminierung zu sensibilisieren, braucht die ADS unsere Unterstützung.

Wir würden uns sehr freuen, wenn Sie die Verbreitung der Umfrage „Diskriminierung in Deutschland“ unterstützen würden. Unter http://www.umfrage-diskriminierung.de finden Sie alle Informationen zur Umfrage und ab dem 1. September 2015 auch den direkten Link zum Fragebogen.




Racist crime in the EU: increasing, under-reported, destroying lives. Until when?

Brussels, 6 May 2015 – Civil society organisations across the EU report an increase in racist crimes in 2013, in particular against Black and Asian ethnic minorities, Roma, Jews and Muslims – or those perceived as such, according to the European Network Against Racism’s latest Shadow Report on racist crime in Europe, covering 26 European countries.


A total of 47,210 racist crimes were officially recorded, but this is only the tip of the iceberg, as many EU Member States do not properly record and report racially motivated crimes.

There was an increase in anti-Semitic (Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands and Sweden) and Islamophobic (France, England and Wales) crimes in some countries, and these crimes increasingly take the form of online incitement to hatred and/or violence. There were cases of violence, abuse or incitement to violence against Roma in almost all EU Member States, and in particular those with a large Roma population. In many EU countries, including Estonia, Greece, Italy, Poland, Sweden and the United Kingdom, the most violent physical attacks reported are perpetrated against Black and Asian people. In Sweden for example, 980 crimes with an Afrophobic motive were recorded. In addition, crimes perpetrated by members of far-right groups are over-represented (49%) in racist crimes and complaints linked to political groups.

In some countries there is no official or systematic data collection of racially motivated crimes; and in others, information about the racial, ethnic or religious background of the victims is not disaggregated. Only one third of EU countries have recorded and published information on racist crimes for 2013. In addition, because many feel ashamed, do not trust the police or think their testimony will not change anything, victims often do not come forward to report racist crimes.

The investigation and prosecution of racist crimes is also problematic. Although most EU Member States recognise racially motived crimes in their legislation, narrow definitions of what constitutes racially motivated crime can result in incidents not being recorded, investigated or prosecuted properly. In the Czech Republic and Italy, an estimated 40-60% of reported racist crimes are not fully investigated by police. Under-qualification of racist crimes takes place throughout the justice system, from police reporting to court judgements.

“Racist crime is one of the worst implications of racism, a threat to people’s lives on the sole basis of their real or perceived race, ethnic origin or religion, and it should not go unpunished”, said ENAR Chair Sarah Isal. “Real political will is required to ensure better reporting, recording and sanctioning of racist crimes. EU Member States must step up their efforts in this area.”

More on ENAR Shadowreport 2013/14

For further information, contact:

Georgina Siklossy, Communication and Press Officer Tel: +32 (0)2 229 35 70 - Mobile: +32 (0)473 490 531 - Email: georgina@enar-eu.org - Web: www.enar-eu.org

Hamburger Abendblatt: Keine Angst vor Berührung

Hamburger Abendblatt, 14.01.2012, Hans-Juergen Fink

Keine Angst vor Berührung: Der Wahl-Hamburger Andreas Hieronymus erforscht als Soziologe Migration und Rassismus in der Hansestadt.

 

more information here!

The return of the neo-Nazis



Siehe auch die ENAR Sonderstudie zu Rassistischer Gewalt in Europa /

See as well the ENAR report on Racist Violence in Europe

--> hier | here

The Equal Rights Trust: Two Found Guilty of Murder of Stephen Lawrence

On 3 January 2012 two men, Gary Dobson and David Norris, were found guilty of the racially-motivated murder of teenager Stephen Lawrence (R v Dobson & Norris). The murder, described by the head of the judiciary of England and Wales as a crime “which scarred the conscience of the nation”, occurred in April 1993. Yet police failings in investigating the crime meant that until 2012, no one had been brought to justice. ERT welcomes the convictions, which mark the latest stage in a chain of events which have fundamentally changed the landscape of race relations in Britain.

more information here!

Muslim Schools and Education in Europe and South Africa

Hieronymus, Andreas: Muslim Identity Formations and Learning Environment, p. 137 - 162.

"This edited collection presents Islamic education in South Africa and a number of countries in Europe. It brings together general concerns of education among Muslims, together with current and unique developments in each country. Given the place of Islamic education in public debate, the collection includes a variety of contributions that respond to the goals and future of Islamic education, the context of terrorism and counter-terrorism, the place of religious education in the context of secular education and the role religious education plays in promoting or hindering social cohesion. It includes reflections on where Muslims should be directing education in the next few years to make it socially relevant and contribute to the democratization of society, as well as some comments on the unfortunate but real crosscurrents in educational policy and counter-terrorist initiatives. In between, it contains some reflective essays on the uniqueness and commonalities of Islamic education in various countries, on unexpected and unknown outcomes, and on new philosophies of education. In fact, the essays may be seen as critical contributions on a number of themes that are debated in the public sphere and within these schools." (from Waxmann)

Reihe "Interkulturelle Pädagogik und postkoloniale Theorie"

Niedrig, Heike / Ydesen, Christian (eds.), Writing Postcolonial Histories of Intercultural Education, Band 2

Content:

Heike Niedrig/Christian Ydesen: Writing Postcolonial Histories of Intercultural Education - An Introduction

Oscar Thomas-Olalde/Astride Velho: Othering and its Effects - Exploring the Concept -

Patricia Baquero Torres: Re-Writing the History of Intercultural Education in Germany from a Postcolonial Theory Perspective

Astrid Messerschmidt: Intercultural Education in a post-National Socialist Society - Processes of Remembrance in Dealing with Racism and anti-Semitism

Rosa Fava: 'Ethnic Conflicts' or Racism? - A German Case Study about «'Problematic' ways of acquiring NS-History in Multicultural Classrooms» re-interpreted from a «Racism-Critical» Perspective

Christopher J. Frey: Yoshitsune Legends in Ezo-Hokkaido: Myth and the Teaching and Learning of Colonialism in Japan's North

Adrea Lawrence: Lessons of Colonization: Uni- and Multi-Directional Learning in Pueblo Indian Country

Catriona Ellis: 'No man is a man who does not discover something, be it a new star or an old manuscript' - The Debate over New Education in Late Colonial India

Mustafa Çapar: 'The Others' in the Turkish Education System and in Turkish Textbooks

Jonas Jakobsen: Education, Recognition and the Sami People of Norway

Christian Ydesen: Educating Greenlanders and Germans - Minority Education in the Danish Commonwealth, 1945-1970

George J. Sefa Die: Post-Colonial Education in West Africa: The Relevance of Local Cultural Teachings for Understanding School, Community, and Society Interface

Heike Niedrig: Multicultural Education and Apartheid - Educational Discourses in South Africa.

Festung Europa - Einsatz gegen Flüchtlinge

Watch ENAR video highlighting some of the main challenges relating to racist crime